1. image: Download

    ikalga:

金剛型衣装考察~巫女衣装との比較 [3]

Handy if you ever have to put on a hakama (I am not male and past that age where I could dress like a Meiji schoolgirl and not look ridiculous)

    ikalga:

    金剛型衣装考察~巫女衣装との比較 [3]

    Handy if you ever have to put on a hakama (I am not male and past that age where I could dress like a Meiji schoolgirl and not look ridiculous)

     
  2. Also coming to live with me…not sure if this woodblock print is a Showa era restrike or a first edition, but it is a Shuho Yamakawa (called Modern Musume (maiden) though I think print collectors also call it Beauty In Kimono)…it came as part of an English language 1938 Osaka Mainichi magazine supplement (shown in the second photo, that bit is coming with the print too)

    If it’s original it was bargain priced, if not it is still lovely to look at.

     
  3. image: Download

    Okay readers of kanji…any ideas what this is? I think the white on black characters in the lower right of this Meiji era woodblock print might be a sumo standing chart but I’m not sure
Cool looking though, isn’t it?

    Okay readers of kanji…any ideas what this is? I think the white on black characters in the lower right of this Meiji era woodblock print might be a sumo standing chart but I’m not sure

    Cool looking though, isn’t it?

     
  4. 09:16

    Notes: 2

    Reblogged from aiyamakimono

    Tags: kimono storage warehouse shelving

    image: Download

    aiyamakimono:

#着物 倉庫の整理整頓なうです^ ^ #tidingup #kimono strage
(this is Aiyama’s kimono warehouse)

Oh boy do I need to tidy up my wafuku as well…first I need to spend some money on shelving and racks though and that means I might have to stop buying kimono & obi for a bit (unless I can find a way to wear my storage devices)!

    aiyamakimono:

    #着物 倉庫の整理整頓なうです^ ^ #tidingup #kimono strage

    (this is Aiyama’s kimono warehouse)

    Oh boy do I need to tidy up my wafuku as well…first I need to spend some money on shelving and racks though and that means I might have to stop buying kimono & obi for a bit (unless I can find a way to wear my storage devices)!

     
  5. image: Download

    Woodblock Print Konishi, Seiichiro, Woman Sewing circa 1956
So excited this lady from the Showa era is coming to live at my house

    Woodblock Print Konishi, Seiichiro, Woman Sewing circa 1956

    So excited this lady from the Showa era is coming to live at my house

     
  6. I just got all three of the mooks (sort of a Japanese combination of a magazine and a book is the definition of a mook) in this series (so far there are just 3) and I think they’re all genius.
They all seem to have the English “Urban Kimono Style” on their covers so I guess it’s safe to call them the “Urban Kimono Style” series of mooks.
What is pictured in them is (mostly) not crazy expensive to buy (a problem of Kimono Salon magazine’s as well as the magazines Utsukushi Kimono and even Nanao) and it’s not as eye-achingly busy and impossible to wear in real life as Kimono Hime (no stylists were allowed to do trashed birds nests / clown wig hairstyles, thank goodness). There’s some edgier looks but you don’t see something that’s too much like cosplay in wafuku (Japanese clothing) or too young looking and too much stuff together like a lot of Japanese street fashion you see out there..
Fresh but not freakish. Totally wearable looks.
The Google translation of this first issue’s title is kind of dorky (as well as the expected awkward you usually get from a computer translation) “Kimono Style - smartly realized  kimono style like his personality” but what’s inside is his and hers kimono looks (more hers than his though, sorry guys) and the his and hers article is just one feature…it shows off ‘Antique Style’ which is more like Momi (Fir) Magazine than Kimono Hime looks but not unacceptable to Kimono Hime fans (these looks either use antique and vintage kimono and accessories or pretty faithful modern reproductions of these styles), “Active Style” which shows women and men wearing kimono with accessories like sneakers (think Keds for women) and baseball caps (on the men) and carrying bigger casual bags (both genders), very sporty looks and “Tradirional Style” which I think was supposed to be “Traditional Style” but for an unfortunate typo but frankly I’d call “menswear inspired” as the kimono have stripes (shima) plaids (on the one guy who is wearing a niftily wound leather belt rather than a stiff obi and the kimono fabric looks like a flannel) and houndstooth (chidori) like the smartly dressed young lady on the cover.
I also really like the photos from the streets of Japan showing people in kimono coordinations they put together themselves (it’s the “Kimono Private Style Catalog” section of the mook) and the general clean simple presentation of accessories, hair style instructions (for the ladies), and how to put on kimono and do a few simple obi knots (musubi).
It left me wanting more but hopefully “Urban Kimono Style” will be popular enough to get many more issues out there
ISBN  9784864930840  published July 2013 by Grafis

    I just got all three of the mooks (sort of a Japanese combination of a magazine and a book is the definition of a mook) in this series (so far there are just 3) and I think they’re all genius.

    They all seem to have the English “Urban Kimono Style” on their covers so I guess it’s safe to call them the “Urban Kimono Style” series of mooks.

    What is pictured in them is (mostly) not crazy expensive to buy (a problem of Kimono Salon magazine’s as well as the magazines Utsukushi Kimono and even Nanao) and it’s not as eye-achingly busy and impossible to wear in real life as Kimono Hime (no stylists were allowed to do trashed birds nests / clown wig hairstyles, thank goodness). There’s some edgier looks but you don’t see something that’s too much like cosplay in wafuku (Japanese clothing) or too young looking and too much stuff together like a lot of Japanese street fashion you see out there..

    Fresh but not freakish. Totally wearable looks.

    The Google translation of this first issue’s title is kind of dorky (as well as the expected awkward you usually get from a computer translation) “Kimono Style - smartly realized kimono style like his personality” but what’s inside is his and hers kimono looks (more hers than his though, sorry guys) and the his and hers article is just one feature…it shows off ‘Antique Style’ which is more like Momi (Fir) Magazine than Kimono Hime looks but not unacceptable to Kimono Hime fans (these looks either use antique and vintage kimono and accessories or pretty faithful modern reproductions of these styles), “Active Style” which shows women and men wearing kimono with accessories like sneakers (think Keds for women) and baseball caps (on the men) and carrying bigger casual bags (both genders), very sporty looks and “Tradirional Style” which I think was supposed to be “Traditional Style” but for an unfortunate typo but frankly I’d call “menswear inspired” as the kimono have stripes (shima) plaids (on the one guy who is wearing a niftily wound leather belt rather than a stiff obi and the kimono fabric looks like a flannel) and houndstooth (chidori) like the smartly dressed young lady on the cover.

    I also really like the photos from the streets of Japan showing people in kimono coordinations they put together themselves (it’s the “Kimono Private Style Catalog” section of the mook) and the general clean simple presentation of accessories, hair style instructions (for the ladies), and how to put on kimono and do a few simple obi knots (musubi).

    It left me wanting more but hopefully “Urban Kimono Style” will be popular enough to get many more issues out there

    ISBN  9784864930840  published July 2013 by Grafis

     
  7. The most interesting quote for both fans of authentic kimono (and also for those whiny cultural [mis]appropriationists) follows:

    "There have been a number of gaps in Japanese clothing history, which contributed to a decline in popularity of indigenous clothing.  “When the bicycle was introduced to Japan in the 1860’s, there wasn’t a corresponding redesigning of the kimono to facilitate its use,” says Takeshi Wakabayashi, Sou Sou’s founder and president.  “Also, most of the restrictive rules of when and how to wear kimono are relatively new to Japan.  Until the end of the feudal period (1868), “there were few rules covering kimono wear.” "

    So 2 interesting points here

    1) The strict ‘Japanese’ kitsuke rules we think of today are actually heavily Victorian/European yofuku (Western clothing) influenced (and then resurrected in Japan post WWII when how to wear kimono was no longer common knowledge for young women and men and their parents which lead to the birth of kimono & kitsuke (dressing techniques and rules) gakuin (academies/schools) taking over kimono-wearing in the post war era and the rules being rather strict).

    So it’s a nice and potentially unanswerable question as to who really is appropriating whose culture here? How much of what the cultural [mis]appropriationists think is Japanese is actually Western fashion ideas of the Victorian era modified to suit Japanese tastes (like mofuku starting in all black and moving to purple after a proscribed mourning period but the clothing bereaved Japanese choose is wa instead of say bustles and corsets and day dresses you can’t take apart to clean and then sew back together easily the way you can with a kimono)?.

    2) Are people like Takeshi Wakabayashi and his partners some kind of race/culture traitors because they’re experimenting with wa (Japanese) fabrics and shapes and clothing forms and reinventing them? Or is this just another way in which the whiny cultural [mis]appropriationists are getting their understanding of their culture and their history wrong while people like Wakabayashi fight for wafuku to have some kind of future, i.e., if Japanese people in Japan or outside of it won’t wear kimono regularly and love them and pass that knowledge onto their descendants, then are Wakabayashi and many others making and selling wa-influenced clothing wrong to be looking to non-Japanese to keep something of their fashion culture alive?

    I’m of the school that says that culture and fashion both evolve and adapt so they can stay alive and relevant to the daily lives and realities of people.

    And I happen to like what Sou Sou is doing with their clothing designs and their jika-tabi especially (split toed shoes with rubber soles that are popularly worn by construction workers, farmers, gardeners and the like, the comparisonof these shoes to sneakers today is understandable if not always perfect). I think they’re a brilliant company and I’ve put my money behind my opinions.


    One more quote I love from the author:

    "We need to ask ourselves, “do we want to buy the same clothes made on the same automatic machines by the same designers from the same chain stores available all over the world?”  As I have personally been inspired by Alice Waters and the Slow Food Movement, I applaud companies like Sou Sou who are creating a grass roots Slow Clothes Movement."

     
  8. 18:01

    Notes: 8

    Reblogged from kisskissbird

    kisskissbird:

    Nagoya Castle - and kimonos in Takashimaya :)

    The longer I study wafuku (traditional Japanese clothing) the more I need more kimono hangers.. and more clothes rails/racks to hang them on. Oy!

     
  9. image: Download

    estrangeiracombr:

JAPÃO, Takayama - Esse foi um jantar especial num ryokan na cidade de Takayama. Ryokan são acomodações tradicionais japonesas, originárias do período Edo (1603–1868), que normalmente tem banhos comunitários, salas comuns onde os hóspedes podem interagir, os quartos tem chão de tatami, futon para dormir, as portas de correr e o kit para preparar o chá. Tudo no estilo bem japonês como se vê nos filmes. Você deixa os sapatos na porta de entrada e lá dentro só usa os chinelinhos que estão à disposição. Eles fornecem o kymono que devemos usar para este tradicional jantar japonês, chamado Kaiseki, onde várias porções pequenas são servidas: verduras, legumes e peixes, que você coloca na panela de água fervente temperada para cozinhar a gosto. Além claro do arroz e missoshiro. Nessa noite só tomamos chá verde, não serviram sake. É uma experiência e tanto dormir uma noite no ryokan.

Whenever I see kaiseki (the absolute tops in Japanese traditional seasonal cuisine) I think I could have a meal or another kimono…being a fan of wafuku (traditional Japanese clothing) more so than washoku (Japanese cuisine in general), you can guess which one gets my money most of the time.

    estrangeiracombr:

    JAPÃO, Takayama - Esse foi um jantar especial num ryokan na cidade de Takayama. Ryokan são acomodações tradicionais japonesas, originárias do período Edo (1603–1868), que normalmente tem banhos comunitários, salas comuns onde os hóspedes podem interagir, os quartos tem chão de tatami, futon para dormir, as portas de correr e o kit para preparar o chá. Tudo no estilo bem japonês como se vê nos filmes. Você deixa os sapatos na porta de entrada e lá dentro só usa os chinelinhos que estão à disposição. Eles fornecem o kymono que devemos usar para este tradicional jantar japonês, chamado Kaiseki, onde várias porções pequenas são servidas: verduras, legumes e peixes, que você coloca na panela de água fervente temperada para cozinhar a gosto. Além claro do arroz e missoshiro. Nessa noite só tomamos chá verde, não serviram sake. É uma experiência e tanto dormir uma noite no ryokan.

    Whenever I see kaiseki (the absolute tops in Japanese traditional seasonal cuisine) I think I could have a meal or another kimono…being a fan of wafuku (traditional Japanese clothing) more so than washoku (Japanese cuisine in general), you can guess which one gets my money most of the time.

     
  10. 17:55

    Notes: 9

    Reblogged from britainfanny

    Tags: Kansai Yamamoto

    britainfanny:

    Problem: I NEED TO BUY KIMONO!
    Reason: DAVID BOWIE.

    Hint: Look for Kansai (Yamamoto) brand kimono…he designed all those awesome things for Bowie (and John Lennon)